Monday, 21 November 2016

Hairy Energy Pack

Morning all,
Well that’s the annual hols out of the way for another year, St Ives lived up to all expectations again, great seas, plenty of fresh air and few light meals. Set a few new records, Caroline found her first Mesolithic flint on the coast path, spotted the first Dalmation Pelican seen in the UK (been here since May and has an 11ft wingspan so difficult to miss if you are in the right place!) and managed 2 weeks with only breakfast eaten in. Now carrying a substantial energy store for the winter ready to fuel all those winter projects. Hoping that the scales read just now I have trimmed my nails.
Back on the nursery we are catching up with all the progress made during our absence, lots of construction/maintenance jobs have been done or started and things are looking good, we should go away more often. The replacement lab store has arrived and is nearly all treated in advance of its construction and the old cold store is stripped out ready for demolition. Hoping to salvage a bit of timber for the wood burner and bag up some of the fibreglass insulation to reuse around the new cold room as we progress, to reuse some of the waste. Looking forward to getting this one up, the excellent insulation levels and small internal cold room should be way more efficient than the old one and the extra storage space in the other end will give more production space in the growth room which will be a huge help in the peak season. We only use the cold-store in the colder 6 months, which might sound daft but that’s how it works in the microprop lab production cycle, so we are attempting to make it convertible to use as an extra growth/rooting room for the rest of the year which again will be a useful change and more efficient use of the facilities.
While we were away an interesting and potentially devastating change to business rating policy came to light. A change in interpretation of some very old definitions of what qualifies as an agricultural business/building means that anyone producing young plants for sale before ‘maturity’ or not in a finished state, could be subject to rates on their whole covered production area. That applies to glasshouses and similar buildings, so for young plant producers in the UK that could make them instantly uncompetitive with most imports in a major way. We had a NBIS meeting last week (in Cornwall luckily) where it became very apparent how serious this was in a business where margins are already being squeezed very tight. The loss of young plant producers is the last thing we should be contemplating as the risk of importing foreign pest and diseases is ever increasing already and we should be encouraging more uk production not less. Horticulture has always been classed as part of agriculture in the past and the development of more efficient specialist young plant producers has benefited the whole industry immensely with introductions of new lines and keeping production costs down. We will be supporting the NFU in their efforts to get this new threat to UK production sorted, if you get the chance please do voice your support to keep us UK growers going.

Availability highlights
We have a few winter performers still on offer and if anyone would like to make up a smaller order we will do our best to get it to you asap. Ideally a 15 tray minimum is best but we could stretch to 12 trays if you are fairly local or we are passing by. The Hellebores are coming on well and a few are ready to roll. We have a great new range of orientalis with several colours and forms (singles, doubles and spotted). They should be flowering from their first winter, in fact we have already spotted the occasional bud, so hopeful of some good sales there, They are certainly looking strong at the moment. Lamium and Ajuga are have attractive fairly evergreen foliage and can look good through the cooler months.
Wooden box collections
We have been collected up lots of wooden trays in recent weeks before things get too damp and cold, so if you have any needing collection just drop us an email and we will add you to the list of destinations.
Have a good week from all at Kirton Farm Nurseries.

Tuesday, 1 November 2016

Hairy Parking

Morning all,
The nice stretch of autumn weather has pushed along the nursery makeover nicely. The new roof over the lab is up and covered with just a few fiddly bits to finish off, enough is in place to stop the leaks which is quite a relief. We also stripped off five split tunnel sheets and got three recovered in good enough conditions to get some stretch into the covers ensuring minimum winter movement. The weather looks like holding long enough to get at least one more finished on Monday, maybe both. The trouble with the recovering job is that having tunnels from 20 to 30 years old you are never quite sure of the state of the timber side rails until the old sheet comes off and we have had to do quite a lot of wood replacement as we have gone along turning a two or three hour job into a 2 or three day job. Frustrating, but at least we can sleep soundly at night in the knowledge that it should all still be there in the morning so not a bad thing really.
I got the first batch of LEDs in the growth room going last weekend so now waiting for the next batch to arrive. I am meanwhile pressing on with some of the shelf alterations and coming up with more and more cunning plans to overcome my lack of arm length so getting quicker with less stress too. I’m glad I took this one on myself, getting someone in would have been a nightmare with the combination of plant relocation on the shelves, shelf reconstruction, light hanging and wiring, all done in small batches when potentially access is needed all the working week by others. My evenings are now booked up pretty solidly with this one but the job satisfaction is a good one. Electric use in there has only dipped a tiny bit so far but it won’t be until the job is complete that we can measure the true impact, can’t wait.
After a fantastic weekend on Tresco a couple of weeks ago we went to the opposite end of the scale yesterday with a visit to central London for a friend’s birthday lunch. We were picked up early by another couple to share the trip in, giving ourselves plenty of time to get there, or so we thought. From somewhere all these people pitched up, driving about and cluttering up the roads making us in the end, late. I was convinced that the car park we had picked would be full but luckily I was wrong and we found a space easily, just a 15 min walk from the venue. After a pleasant meal in great company and a bit of a walk about, we returned to the car park to find out why it wasn’t full, £26 fed into the machine to get out! Obliviously a lot of folk find this environment very exciting, all those people, all that concrete and glass but I’m afraid I just don’t get it, give me some green space please. It was a one day adventure I suppose, but you can stick the Shard in the London Eye for all I care, the main thing a day like that does for me is make me appreciate what we have out here in the sticks!

Availability highlights
We have a few winter performers still on offer and if anyone would like to make up a smaller order we will do our best to get it to you asap. Ideally a 15 tray minimum is best but we could stretch to 12 trays if you are fairly local or we are passing by. The little hardy Cyclamen coum are just getting started now, with a few flowers open and loads of bud to come. This range flowers from now until April, a real winter star.
The Hellebores are coming on well and a few are ready to roll. We have a great new range of orientalis with several colours and forms (singles, doubles and spotted). They should be flowering from their first winter, in fact we have already spotted the occasional bud, so hopeful of some good sales there, They are certainly looking strong at the moment.
We have a very few Schizostylus (Hesperatha) Fenland Daybreak in bud and flower this week and fresh batches of coccinea Red and Oregano Sunset both looking nice. Not quite sure if they will flower this autumn but strong bushy plants full of promise.
The very late flowering Kniphofia Limelight is in flower now, we don’t have many, but they are big bold flowers which are almost luminous in their intensity. Still a few flowers on the Erodium Bishops Form which has been in flower virtually non-stop since April. We have a very pretty crop of Tiarella in flower at the moment, should look good for a little bit longer yet. Lamium and Ajuga are have attractive fairly evergreen foliage and can look good through the cooler months.
Wooden box collections
We have been collected up lots of wooden trays in recent weeks before things get too damp and cold, so if you have any needing collection just drop us an email and we will add you to the list of destinations.
Have a good week from all at Kirton Farm Nurseries.

Monday, 24 October 2016

Hairy mumurings

Morning all,

Things are quietening down now on the sales front as much of the stock starts to go into hibernation, but the jobs on the nursery just keep on rolling out. We have had a hectic couple of weeks with loads of exciting projects getting underway. Deliveries have started to arrive with materials accumulating to get going on all the new winter tasks. The bank manager looks like being helpful so we have plunged into a fair bit of site investment. No real single big job but several smaller developments which have been waiting in the wings for a while.
The new roof structure to erect over the rather leaky lab and growth room is already more than halfway to being completed. A giant jigsaw, the guide being an A4 diagram with part numbers shown for instruction and with none of the parts labelled, it has taken a bit longer than I planned! A couple of parts were missing which hasn’t helped and the cover is not big enough but we’ll get there. The main structure is up, square and solid with not too many bits left over, just the fine tweaking, cleaning and cover to go on, so good job done there.
A few tunnel sides had rotted away over the years and the covers were only just hanging on, so a couple of us have been removing the old timber and replacing with new while the covers are still in place. It’s a tricky job but with one tunnel complete and another well on the way the results are very impressive, nice tight covers and the net sides neater than they were before we started.
The first batch of LED lights for the growth room arrived last week and I’ve used the weekend while the lab is empty, to get started and fit a few. With 120 units to fit I should have the first 18 up by this evening. It’s nearly as frustrating as those plug and play computers that don’t. The units are really neat, easy to hang and plug in, but taking down the old units, changing the shelf support structures and all the wiring to make them fit is monstrously time consuming. Good job it’s my cheap labour doing most of the work. Everything is on tight shelving and there is loads of unscrewing and refitting of bits that are just out of reach or on the borderline. It’s a good job there is no CCTV recording the colourful dialogue in there as yet another nut slips from my fingertips and drops down the back never to be seen again. The first bank is lit and looks great, there’s loads more working height on the shelves and 65%+ less electric used, so well worth it in the end.
We had two new company’s visit us with regards to our wind turbine maintenance, as our original installers are no more. One used an ultrasonic tester to check all our foundation bolts, just in case, and found all ok which was reassuring for the insurers and the new servicing company who came this week for the annual check and greasing. Natural Energy are the new team and they have certainly made a good impression so far. Very detailed reports, reduced the slight blade whistle on the one slightly noisier turbine (if you get up close) and no extra costs on top of the quoted rate which was very competitive.
On the birding front we have been graced with an expanding starling roost in our wind break this autumn. What started as 50 or 60 is now several hundred and if the weather is right we get a nice little murmuration in the late afternoon. They create quite a racket as they settle down for the night, a raucous alternative to the summer chatter of the house martins and swallows but evocative none the less. 16 Wood Sandpipers last weekend but had to rough it on Tresco for that one.
Availability highlights
We have a few winter performers still on offer and if anyone would like to make up a smaller order we will do our best to get it to you asap. Ideally a 15 tray minimum is best but we could stretch to 12 trays if you are fairly local or we are passing by. Still a few Asters looking great with bud and colour showing. We have several new varieties, many mildew free/resistant (ageratoides and frikartii types). The large intensely purple flowered but compact Purple Dome and the taller strong growing deep pink Andenken an Alma Pötschke are both carrying masses of bud just beginning to burst open. The little hardy Cyclamen coum are just getting started now, with a few flowers open and loads of bud to come. This range flowers from now until April, a real winter star.
The Hellebores coming on well and a few are ready to roll. We have a great new range of orientalis with several colours and forms (singles, doubles and spotted). They should be flowering from their first winter, in fact we have already spotted the occasional bud, so hopeful of some good sales there, They are certainly looking strong at the moment. There is a very pretty fresh crop of Tiarella in flower at the moment, should look good for a few weeks yet. Lamium and Ajuga are have attractive fairly evergreen foliage and can look good through the cooler months.
Wooden box collections
We have been collected up lots of wooden trays in recent weeks before things get too damp and cold, so if you have any needing collection just drop us an email and we will add you to the list of destinations.
Have a good week from all at Kirton Farm Nurseries.

Monday, 10 October 2016

Hairy Impact

Morning all

Definitely a bit cooler now with summer seeming a long way off already, although we did spot a couple of quite big flocks of swallows seemingly heading north earlier this week, although they were feeding rather than making haste. Sales have taken their usual autumnal slide so the cash-flow is due to follow suit very soon which is always a bit scary. However the bank manager was on the phone earlier in the week and making positive noises so hopefully the planned expenditure on the new LED lighting in the growth room and other winter projects will get some support.
I’ve just frightened myself by checking out the new Winchester Green Impact online toolkit (run by the NUS). I had got quite excited at the launch a few weeks ago and raved about how much more valuable it could be as a means of further improving our environmental performance when compared with some other schemes we have joined in with over the years. Sure enough there is far more depth to this accreditation and plenty of help available, but the realisation that I have just added a whole extra layer to my workload is now hitting home. The main tricky bit is that the underlying drive of the project is to change the culture of organisations to a more sustainable outlook and so it doesn’t always sit easily with organisations that already have sustainability as a core ingredient of all they do. There are definitely some improvements that will be prompted by the scheme but it will take a while to get me to toe the line with filling in all the necessary evidence and written stuff needed for completion of the award levels. There looks like a minimum of two or three years to get to the top level and maybe longer if things don’t go smoothly, but then if there is a constant nudge to improve that will keep us interested and engaged. Apparently one of the benefits of the process is that we may get to meet some people in the organisation we may not have seen before, I’m hoping that isn’t the case here, although I do sometimes wonder where all the wages go each week.
Cold enough to light the wood-burner yesterday, a nice warm glow in the house but rather unsettling because of my lack of winter preparation. There are a few logs ready to use but it looks like being a hand to mouth winter as far as fuel is concerned unless I give in to buying in some timber. Not enough hours in the day to fit it all in, especially as it is now dark by the time I’m homeward bound.
Hockey match in a couple of hours, likely to be another thrashing against one of the best teams in the old farts league we are in. Still at least they are very nice about it, and it’s not raining or too cold and we won the quiz last night.

Availability highlights
Still a few Asters looking great with bud and colour showing. We have several new varieties, many mildew free/resistant (ageratoides and frikartii types). Starshine and Stardust are two of the new ones looking great. The large intensely purple flowered but compact Purple Dome and the taller strong growing deep pink Andenken an Alma Pötschke are both carrying masses of bud just beginning to burst open, both mildew resistant stunners.
The little hardy Cyclamen coum are just getting started now, with a few flowers open and loads of bud to come. This range flowers from now until April, a real winter star.
The Hellebores coming on well and a few are ready to roll. We have a great new range of orientalis with several colours and forms (singles, doubles and spotted). They should be flowering from their first winter so hopeful of some good sales there, They are certainly looking strong at the moment.
We still have a few Erigeron karvinskianus  in bud and flower. Prettily scrambling away and still in flower. We have a late flush of bud on many of the Anemone japonica varieties.
There is a very pretty fresh crop of Tiarella in flower at the moment, should look good for a few weeks yet. We have a few pink Erodiums in flower which are looking nice and should keep going until the frosts. Some of the summer potted Achillea are showing bud as they bulk up before their winter rest.

Wooden box collections
We have been collected up lots of wooden trays in recent weeks before things get too damp and cold, so if you have any needing collection just drop us an email and we will add you to the list of destinations. Lots collected and cleaned up already but always room for more.

Have a good week from all at Kirton Farm Nurseries.

Tuesday, 4 October 2016

Light and Hairy

Morning all,
A lovely morning here after some heavy showers yesterday and a couple more nice days to come, let’s hope this weather holds a bit longer as we tweak every last bit of growth out of the plants before the cold sets in. Some stock has already come to a halt with the shortening days but it always amazes me how much growth still happens between now and Christmas with some lines. It’s those evergreens that just keep on rolling, some like the Erysimum we don’t even pot most until October otherwise they would be too big by the spring and of course the more obvious winter stars like the Helleborus and Cyclamen coum just come into their own. I would have loved to still have some Schizostylis to offer but they have already flown although if the weather holds we might get a few red ones again in a week or two, we’ll see. Despite reduced activity on the sales front, it’s been a week of building pressure with tunnels still to clear, the potting still to be finished, microprop pricking out still rushing through, the spring flowering bulbs arriving and materials for the ‘quiet time’ projects starting to arrive. The new roof for the lab and growth room is sat on a pallet in the yard begging to be put up and a host of electrical fittings and slotted angle iron are stacked up for the big growth room LED light conversion which the sooner it’s fitted the sooner it will start to repay itself. It has a target saving of 50% of the entire nursery electric consumption although I can’t quite believe it will be that good, I suspect I won’t be able to resist putting up a few extra lights to add to the output potential of the lab which would help payback but bump up consumption a bit. It will take 12+ weeks to get all the lights in due to the amount of shelf adjusting, new wiring and delays to most of the light unit delivery but as usual I will keep an eye on the daily consumption and report any improvement.
Luckily having some big projects has given me the chance for some retail therapy and improve my tool collection, a new wire stripper has improved productivity of the 150+ or so cables needed by the electrician and a mini rechargeable screwdriver and mini ratchet set is helping shelf reconstruction a lot, there must be 1,000 or so bolts to be undone and repositioned as well as 500+ screws to undo and tighten. Tried both out already and they work a treat although I suspect by the end of the job I may well be sick of the sight of them.
Must get on and get some more wood cut for winter, the pile is growing but not quickly enough, due mainly to a number of nursery distractions and my new toys to play with.

Availability highlights
A wide range of Asters are looking great with bud and colour showing. We have several new varieties, many mildew free/resistant (ageratoides and frikartii types). Starshine and Stardust are two of the new ones looking great, while the Rosenwitchel, Lady in Blue and Snowpillow are full one with their autumnal displays. The large intensely purple flowered but compact Purple Dome are carrying masses of bud just beginning to burst open, a stunner.
The little hardy Cyclamen coum are just getting started now, with a few flowers open and loads of bud to come. This range flowers from now until April, a real winter star. The Hellebores coming on well and a few are ready to roll. We have a great new range of orientalis with several colours and forms (singles, doubles and spotted). They should be flowering from their first winter so hopeful of some good sales there, They are certainly looking strong at the moment.
We still have Erigeron karvinskianus  in bud and flower. Prettily scrambling away it flowers for ever. We have a late flush of bud on many of the Anemone japonica varieties. There is a very pretty fresh crop of Tiarella in flower at the moment, should look good for a few weeks yet. We have a few pink Erodiums in flower which are looking nice and should keep going until the frosts. Some of the summer potted Achillea are showing bud as they bulk up before their winter rest.  There is also flower on the Anthemis Charme which is a bright new compact variety with numerous pretty small yellow daisies which flower for an age.

Wooden box collections
We have been making a concerted effort to collect up lots of wooden trays in recent weeks before things get too damp and cold so if you have any needing collection just drop us an email and we will add you to the list of destinations. Lots collected and cleaned up already but always room for more.
Have a good week from all at Kirton Farm Nurseries.

Tuesday, 27 September 2016

Hairy Equinox

Morning all,
Autumn panic all round as we try and get all the potting finished. Just a few of the more vigorous types to go and the spring bulbs which are due in any minute. Still clearing up from the summer production and sales in advance of the potters. This is always a satisfying job, regaining control, tidiness and order from apparent chaos. Holidays are being taken left right and centre after the school hols are over and prices fall, which is great and well earned by those taking it but adds an extra layer of pressure on those left trying to get on top of things. Luckily only another couple of weeks of production pressure on the nursery and then we can relax into the quiet of the autumn and winter (see below).
The lab work meanwhile is beginning to gear up as they get started on another big production year. In an effort to reduce the impact of the living wage increases (11% this year) we are trying to spread the lab production peak over a longer period which seems to be working ok, the only downside being that there is little let up in work to draw breath, relax and take stock. The lab output starts much earlier in the year than the nursery and is now finishing later so no pressure there! I now drawn up a monster list of all the projects that we ideally need to complete over next few ‘quiet’ months.
  • We have a new roof to go over the lab and growth room to stop the rot (literally). 
  • We are looking to replace the remaining 120 fluorescent lights in the lab growth room with LEDs which means remaking shelves, rewiring and mounting. 
  • The cold store has dissolved in damp and decay over the last few years so it needs replacing (new super insulated shed with a small internal cold store on the wish list).
  • New drainage channels for the nursery for flood prevention and water collection/recycling.
  • Install a small acid bulk tank to treat our hard water, replacing the more hazardous multiple drums currently used. 
  • Ground cover to install to further reduce herbicide use.
  • The list goes on.....
Luckily the bank manager wrote last week saying how he would like to lend more. Let’s hope he means it.

Availability highlights
The little hardy Cyclamen coum are just getting started now, with a few flowers open and loads of bud to come. This range flowers from now until April, a real winter star. The Hellebores coming on well and a few are ready to roll. We have a great new range of orientalis with several colours and forms (singles, doubles and spotted). They should be flowering from their first winter so hopeful of some good sales there, They are certainly looking strong at the moment. We still have Erigeron karvinskianus  in bud and flower. Prettily scrambling away it flowers for ever. We have a late flush of bud on many of the Anemone japonica varieties.
We cut back and potted a few more Echinacea a while ago and we now have a nice bonus crop of a couple of varieties producing a flush of bud and colour. Lovely plants but they won’t hang around long. A wide range of Asters are appearing with more and more bud and colour showing. We have several new varieties, many mildew free/resistant (ageratoides and frikartii types).
There is a very pretty fresh crop of Tiarella in flower at the moment, should look good for a few weeks yet. We have a few pink Erodiums in flower which are looking nice and should keep going until the frosts. Some of the summer potted Achillea are showing bud as they bulk up before their winter rest. There is also flower on the Anthemis Charme which is a bright new compact variety with numerous pretty small yellow daisies which flower for an age.
I’ll just whisper it quietly that we have a few Schizostylis (Hesperatha) in bud and showing the odd bit of colour. They are quite early this season and not many left I’m afraid so don’t tell everyone. We will try and grow extra of all varieties, but especially our red form next year. I have a couple of the red left which are just opening and they are spectacular, great colour and big flowers. It’s a specially selected form which we propagate in our microprop lab so it comes true to type, the only issue really is the crop timing, it usually tends to be a bit late flowering for most but it is well worth waiting for.

Wooden box collections
We have been making a concerted effort to collect up lots of wooden trays in recent weeks before things get too damp and cold so if you have any needing collection just drop us an email and we will add you to the list of destinations. Lots collected and cleaned up already but always room for more.
Have a good week from all at Kirton Farm Nurseries.

Monday, 19 September 2016

Hairy sustainability at an old age

Morning all,

 Now the house martins have gone too and suddenly after a sweltering week, today feels much more autumnal. A relief in some ways but a shock to have to find more clothes to put on. Good weather for hockey and after a resounding 11-2 victory last weekend we have a tougher match to look forward to tomorrow, just hoping that this time we won’t get so wet. I think that was my first win for over a year, last year was not one to remember too fondly, only won once and I wasn’t playing that week, then broke my finger towards the seasons end just to cap it off. Fed up big time and an end to any hopes of a successful hand modelling career.
Very busy finishing off the bulk of the summer and early autumn potting after the delayed compost delivery eventually arrived on Monday evening. A few more days to go now but we will need to dip into the next container of pots that docked on Friday which must indicate good news on the sales front for the summer but has meant an extra pre-winter purchase which always dents the cash-flow somewhat. We always start getting a bit twitchy at this time of year as the overdraft starts to edge upwards again and the likelihood of any late sales surge fade into the afternoon sunset. Suddenly every purchase gets looked at a bit harder and thoughts turn to ever more efficiencies to build into next year’s production. At least now we have a few minutes to think about it rather than leaping from one urgent job to another.
Part of our ongoing development involved a meeting last week of the local Sustainable Business Partnership at Sparsholt College to see a few presentations on all the latest environmental news. We have taken part in quite a few local initiatives over the years, PLATO Sustain was a very good one and we learnt a lot in that group, 10:10 was a national campaign to highlight carbon reduction but only really concentrating on the achievements made around 2010, and Carbon Smart Winchester was a locally funded audit scheme which sought to recognise carbon reduction achievements in the area. Both the 10:10 and Carbon Smart schemes were nice to be a part of and it was great to be able to show a gold certificate recognising our achievements but they were a bit too focussed on carbon reduction which is only a part of the sustainability agenda and neither were very proactive once you got to the top, on inspiring greater things. Both schemes have fizzled out now, in this area anyway, so it was great to see the NUS (yes the National Union of Students) promoting a Winchester version of their Green Impact Scheme which has a much broader sustainability scope and what appears to be a more proactive involvement in spreading ideas and inspiration among the participants. Apparently students were asked what they wanted the NUS to put their efforts into and this was a big concern. There is quite a bit of student training and involvement in the auditing and knowledge transfer which is great experience for them and keeps costs for the scheme admin low. It will be interesting to see how it goes and get some youthful input, we’ll certainly have a go at it.

Availability highlights
We still have Erigeron karvinskianus  in bud and flower. Prettily scrambling away it flowers for ever. We cut back and potted a few more Echinacea a while ago and we now have a nice bonus crop of a couple of varieties producing a flush of bud and colour. Lovely plants but they won’t hang around long.
A wide range of Asters are appearing with more and more bud and colour showing. We have several new varieties, many mildew free/resistant (ageratoides and frikartii types).
There is a very pretty fresh crop of Tiarella in flower at the moment, should look good for a few weeks yet. We have a few pink Erodiums in flower which are looking nice and should keep going until the frosts. Some of the summer potted Achillea are showing bud as they bulk up before their winter rest.
There is also bud appearing on the Anthemis varieties. Charme is a bright new compact variety with numerous pretty little yellow daisies which flowers for an age.
The little hardy Cyclamen coum are just getting started now, with a few flowers open and loads of bud to come. This range flowers from now until April, a real winter star.
The Hellebores are coming on well and a few are ready to roll. We have a great new range of orientalis with several colours and forms (singles, doubles and spotted). They should be flowering from their first winter so hopeful of some good sales there, They are certainly looking strong at the moment.

Wooden box collections
We are making a concerted effort to collect up a few wooden trays over the coming weeks before things get too damp and cold so if you have any needing collection just drop us an email and we will add you to the list of destinations.
from all at Kirton Farm Nurseries