Sunday, 8 October 2017

Hairy end to Spring

Morning all,
What a great week that was. Lots of end of season stuff got finished after what seems like a really long and exciting ‘spring’. I say spring as that always used to be how we described our manic sales and production period in days gone by. Now our ‘spring’ has elongated a tad to run from February to September which is great for the cash flow and business as a whole, but possibly a bit more taxing on the work load front. Anyway this week we finished the years potting with the last of the spring bulbs nestling in their peat free winter homes and the fantastic Erysimum plugs arriving and diving straight into a pot. Despite years of seeing it happen before I still can’t quite believe the Erysimums will be in bud and flower by the early spring as they come in so late and so small but they just keep on growing forming lovely strong bushy stock by the time next seasons sales get under way. We grow them under cover but in open sided tunnels with no heat so they keep a toughness to their habit (other than being grown in the relatively warm softy southern end of the country!).
The annual stock-take also got completed as this moment marks the end of our financial year. It’s always a bit of a slog and feels rather unproductive but it does give us a very useful snapshot of stock levels from which we can accurately update the computer more sensibly order next seasons plugs and pot labels. With the large amount of stock already potted so that it is ready for the spring it all adds up to a scary cost value, just sat out there waiting for the winter to throw its worst at it and hopefully then finding a sales slot somewhere nice. I’m sure it will be fine, it usually all works out in the end despite the odd crop or weather disaster. Just got to get the September books completed and we can see how well the year has gone, We have a good idea how it should look, although when the figures are done it can sometimes be a surprise, suffice to say that we won’t be retiring just yet as none of those surprises have ever been good ones!
Among the many exciting challenges on the nursery this Xyella scare is getting quite concerning. With some host plants being big sellers in the nursery trade, like rosemary and lavender, are we going to see much tougher restrictions on plant movement which will impact hugely on supply of finished plants and young plants alike. A monster amount of propagated material comes in from Europe and further afield as rooted and unrooted material, and with an ever growing range of host plants being identified is anything coming in from abroad safe? If it gets over here the current long term (5 year) plant movement restrictions imposed could be devastating to any nursery, to the point of ceasing to trade. Best not think about it too much.
I also got a new lease of life this week with new glasses collected and bank balance emptied. After managing with an old pair for ages that had got trodden on and rather scratched and mangled it’s nice to be able to see clearly without the mark of Zorro etched onto every view. Not only that but I managed to purchase a new batch of trousers to replace the all the old aerated ones of which I has amassed quite a collection. I haven’t quite managed to throw out my old friends yet but I’m sure they will start disappearing soon.

Availability highlights
Autumn and winter flowering Cyclamen are just coming on line. The Cyclamen coum Cyberia series flower from now until April, showing short and dainty flowers and bud. I can see some bud still coming on the remaining autumn flowering hederifolium types but not enough to say they are ‘in flower’, they have just sold too fast! The Helleborus range is gradually increasing as winter approaches, no bud yet but nice plants.
Another evergreen spring flowerer currently looking smart are the Bergenias. The compact Diamond Drops are looking particularly dapper. We have a few Tradescantia Rubra which are having a late flowering flush. Looking good. The compact and free flower Anthemis Charme are now in bud. They flower for ages.
There are a few nice short Nepeta Six Hills in bud at the moment. The dinky little Junior Walker has shot back after a trim to make nice bushy plants with another flower flush showing. Only a few remaining Asters now and some are still coming into flower. We have a fantastic crop of Ajuga in range of leaf colours just bursting to get into the garden. Fresh batches of Euphorbia are looking nice in a range of foliage colours
Bright variegated leaves of the short tufted grass Carex Evergold are looking very neat and smart.

Wooden box returns
We have collected the majority of our wooden boxes up now but please do drop us a line if you would like us to pop in and collect any more up.

Thanks,
Have a good week from all at Kirton Farm Nurseries.

Monday, 2 October 2017

Hairy Chatter

Morning all,

With the tree leaves turning so quickly it’s difficult to imagine there is much more growing time left on the nursery, but I know quite a lot of lines will carry on making strong root growth for manyl weeks to come. Some lines like the Erysimum are only going into pots in the next week or two and as quite small rooted cuttings, but we know they will still need double spacing to allow for a good plant shape to form through the late autumn and winter. They get no extra heat or special lighting just keep on growing whenever the natural seasonal temperatures allow and will start budding up for an early spring flowering on a strong and bushy plant framework. Star performers, I wish they were all so accommodating!
Then there are the spring bulbs which we have just started potting, they are a huge faff to pot but again make loads of late root growth ready to support their delightful spring display. We have a special routine to follow with this crop due to their popularity with the local mice population. A few seasons ago we got caught out putting the crop straight onto the nursery beds and over a couple of weeks the entire crop of the little Snakeshead Lily (Fritillaria) got nicked or eaten. We found most of the crop a couple of months later when they started to emerge from the buried store just outside the tunnel, but by then it was too late to save them. Now we stack the whole potted and watered crop on trolleys in despatch for the autumn and early winter until they start to emerge. We can then put them down reasonably safely on the nursery given the support of a few well positioned and covered protective traps.
Summer has left, the house martins went on Monday. A huge migrating flock of them appeared over the nursery in the morning and stayed for 20 minutes or so having a good feed over the tunnels before drifting south, taking our lot with them. Never mind, their summer chattering has been replaced with an autumn mega chatter. Our conifer windbreak behind the house has become an autumnal starling roost which just at the moment is swelling rapidly in numbers. We are getting a mini murmuration display of a few hundred as the light fades, not on the huge scale of some we have seen, but still something to grab your attention if you time it right. After they all settle into the trees there is a cacophony of chatter as hundreds of them check out that they are all ok and sat in the right place. It reminds me a bit of the slightly calmer burblings you get with groups of waders on estuaries in the winter, that constant reassurance they give each other as they get on with their daily routines. ‘I’m alright are you alright?’ ‘Yes thanks I’m alright, are you all right?’ ‘Thanks, I’m alright, you all right?’ until a predator flies over and all hell lets loose.
Brilliant evening out last Saturday at the Water Buffalo farm at Broughton, very nice local beers and cider, delicious buffalo burger and some great music in a renovated old barn. Even a dance floor to express oneself on, which I might have been a bit too over-eager on (excess beer, not enough burger!). Luckily very few people we knew were there to notice my small tumble after miscalculating how gravity worked.
Keep yourselves upright, it’s easier.

Availability highlights
Autumn and winter flowering Cyclamen are just coming on line. The Cyclamen coum Cyberia series flower from now until April, showing short and dainty flowers and bud. I can see some bud still coming on the remaining autumn flowering hederifolium types but not enough to say they are ‘in flower’, they have just sold too fast! The compact and free flower Anthemis Charme are now in bud. They flower for ages.
Fresh batches of the ever popular Achillea coming on nicely with new flowers shoots appearing on several colours. There are a few nice short Nepeta Six Hills in bud at the moment. The dinky little Junior Walker has shot back after a trim to make nice bushy plants with another flower flush showing. The short Campanula carpatica is in bud again after an earlier trim. A few remaining Asters are still coming into flower.
We have a fantastic crop of Ajuga in range of leaf colours just bursting to get into the garden. Fresh batches of Euphorbia are looking nice in a range of foliage colours. Bright variegated leaves of the short tufted grass Carex Evergold are looking very neat and smart.

Wooden box returns
We have collected the majority of our wooden boxes up now but please do drop us a line if you would like us to pop in and collect any more up. Thanks.
Have a good week from all at Kirton Farm Nurseries.


Monday, 25 September 2017

Hairynox

Morning all

Feeling very autumnal over the last couple of weeks and the panic is on to get everything potted and settled down before winter sets in. The tunnels are filling quickly and the last half load of compost is due in on Monday so the end is in sight which will be a relief. We have even lit the wood-burner at home a few evenings just to take the chill off, the trouble is it sends me off to sleep even earlier than usual.
Despite the change in season the house martins are still hanging about, hoovering up insects over the nursery and surrounding fields, but it must be very nearly time to move on, we’ve seen a few larger flocks drifting south over the last few days. I’m feeling like I would like to drift away for a bit too, just beginning to flag as the season begins to fade away and getting a bit jealous of all the others gadding off on their holidays.
Picked up a few conkers earlier, couldn’t resist, they just look so shiny and new when they first pop out. Always keeping an eye open for some really good ones, although it must be nearly fifty years since I strung one for battle! Always have a little pile just inside the door as they are supposed to deter spider ingress at this time of year, it reduces my main manly role these days of dealing with intruders.
Building up my arm strength over the last couple of weeks with making up numbers on the potting machine, wrestling apart the hairy pots to feed the continuous demand from the jaws of the machine. The thin smear of latex that holds the pot fibres together makes the pot surface quite grippy and when the pot stacks are packed so tightly they can be a bit of a challenge to get apart. It is quite important for me to look cool doing this task, to demonstrate an air of calm efficiency while maintaining maximum output, but this can be quite tricky to achieve as tiredness creeps in. Earlier in the week I had to disguise a painful industrial accident when the pots refused to separate and my halo slipped. A change in pulling direction and a really big tug resulted in dealing myself a hefty blow to a very sensitive area resulting in watery eyes and that long, deep, abdominal pain 50% of you will know about. Luckily everyone else was concentrating on their roles and didn’t notice the impact while I managed somehow to adjust my position and carry on while gathering my thoughts. My new yoga training came in very handy, a bit of deep breathing, in through my toes and out through the affected area subdued the pain, if you girls can get through delivering a baby with a bit of heavy breathing I was sure it would me help me through this. It did.
Must go, I have a date with a water buffalo burger and 6 hrs of live Blues and Funk at a local farm. Not something I’ve done before so looking forward to a new experience. Have fun.

Availability highlights

Autumn and winter flowering Cyclamen are just coming on line. The Cyclamen coum Cyberia series flower from now until April, showing short and dainty flowers and bud. I can see some bud still coming on the remaining autumn flowering hederifolium types but not enough to say they are ‘in flower’, they have just sold too fast!
The compact and free flower Anthemis Charme are now in bud. They flower for ages.Fresh batches of the ever popular Achillea coming on nicely with new flowers shoots appearing on several colours.
There are a few nice short Nepeta Six Hills in bud at the moment. The dinky little Junior Walker has shoot back after a trim to make nice bushy plants with another flower flush showing. The short Campanula carpatica is in bud again after an earlier trim. Lots of the Asters are busting a gut to get into flower, The mildew free Ashvi, and Asram, now have well developed bud and the odd open flower. We have a fantastic crop of Ajuga in range of leaf colours just bursting to get into the garden. Fresh batches of Euphorbia are looking nice in a range of foliage colours. Bright variegated leaves of the short tufted grass Carex Evergold are looking very neat and smart.

Wooden box returns

We are having a scoot around collecting up any wooden boxes you may have ready for collection over the next couple of weeks so we can get them clean, dried and repaired ready for next spring. So please do drop us a line if you would like us to pop in and collect those up. We should be doing a couple of Midland and more northern runs in the coming week if we can squeeze them in around the orders. We’ve already collected masses of them but there are a few more to come I hope. Thanks.

Have a good week from all at Kirton Farm Nurseries.


Monday, 11 September 2017

Hairy Wind

Morning all,

What a dramatic week on the world weather front. What with Irma still bashing its way across the Caribbean and into the US and the monsoon flooding further east causing large scale destruction and chaos it’s on the personal scale that it impacts most with people’s homes and livelihoods shattered. When we get smaller scale issues piling up here it feels like the world is against you, it is so difficult to really imagine the enormous life changing upheaval such devastating disasters must have on the individuals affected. I’m counting my blessings that with all the challenges that seem to accumulate at this end we are all still willing and able to travel in a positive direction.
The modern world of instant news and communication creates for me a bit of a conflict of interest. Concern for those affected is of course there, but the fascination of being able to watch the Irma story unfold from a distance, more or less as it happens, strikes me as being akin to watching the F1 races in anticipation of there being a crash. You wouldn’t want to admit it but the spectacle of such devastating power has a real draw to it. The US is next on the hit list for Irma and the scale of exodus from Florida must be astonishingly difficult to cope with. Virtually a whole state on the move which involves millions of people is just mind blowing. On one hand, for the individuals involved I hope that it blows itself out pretty quickly and they can all return to normal in a few days, but on the other is this the sort of lesson Donald needs to see to consider if there might be something in this global warming thing. I know one event doesn’t prove anything but as a demonstration of how a change in the weather can affect change big lumps of the world perhaps we should be making a more conscious effort to do better. On a more personal note I would like to say that it’s not all down to Donald and the like, we can all do our bit.
Ok, rant over. Our swallows have left, after the usual two broods, although not as many young ones raised this year, I suspect the erratic summer weather didn’t help. There are still the odd one or two passing over the nursery and the house martins are still here so I’m still clinging onto the idea that summer is not quite yet over.

Availability highlights
The compact and free flower Anthemis Charme are now in bud. They flower for ages.Fresh batches of the ever popular Achillea coming on nicely with new flowers shoots appearing on several colours. There are a few nice short Nepeta Six Hills in bud at the moment. The dinky little Junior Walker has shoot back after a trim to make nice bushy plants with another flower flush showing. The short Campanula carpatica is in bud again after an earlier trim.
Lots of the Asters are busting a gut to get into flower, The mildew free Ashvi, Asmo, and Asram, now have well developed bud and the odd open flower. Lady in Blue, Jenny and Starlight have loads of bud developing.
We have a fantastic crop of Ajuga in range of leaf colours just bursting to get into the garden. Fresh batches of Euphorbia are looking nice in a range of foliage colours. Bright variegated leaves of the short tufted grass Carex Evergold are looking very neat and smart.

Wooden box returns
We are having a scoot around collecting up any wooden boxes you may have ready for collection over the next few weeks so we can get them clean, dried and repaired ready for next spring. So please do drop us a line if you would like us to pop in and collect those up. We’ve already collected lots but there are more to come I hope.
Thanks.
Have a good week from all at Kirton Farm Nurseries.

Monday, 4 September 2017

Hairy Shows

Morning all,

Harvest is in at last after a good run at the end of last week and a couple of good days this. Relief all round I think, just the fields to cultivate and re-sow for next year and they can all relax again! From what I gather it was a mixed bag, some crops very poor and some better than expected so if prices pick up a bit it won’t be too bad.
It’s September already, the cooler nights, shorter days and morning damp are pushing all the autumnal buttons and making me restless to get the potting done asap so that we get enough growth on the crops before winter sets in. It’s always such a rush to get it all done, getting the tunnels clear and clean, plants prepared and enough bodies on the potting machine and then suddenly it’s the weekend again. It’ll all be fine, most crops burst through all we throw at them by the spring. Just about recovered from the bank holiday weekend which was pretty full. The local village festival was very local and generally I think a good time was had by all. I managed just over 8 hours before retiring for a lie down and unfortunately I suspect we missed the best band who we could hear still playing, booming over the fields, close to midnight. We were saving ourselves for an early morning start for the following days trip to the Isle of Wight. The ferry crossing adds the ambience and excitement of an exotic holiday even if perhaps the Red Funnel cuisine doesn’t. A stunning day on the beach turned a few of us fairly rosy cheeked although I only actually got as daring as getting the socks off under my sandals, the trousers, hat and shirt stayed put, nurseryman’s torso’s aren’t something to parade in public! A delicious BBQ finished the beach trip perfectly and a great sunset over the Solent on the cruise home was spectacular. Now we are all refreshed from our summer holidays ready to roll on with renewed vigour into the autumn.
Popped into the Alresford Show earlier today to check out all things agricultural. Great weather and a thronging crowd made for a grand day out with masses of local food and drink on show as well fantastic displays of vintage and new agricultural kit. They must have had record crowds as the car-park was close to bursting and several of the food stands ran out of stock part way through. I called into the NFU stand to meet our new local advisor who recently took on the Winchester area. He might have regretted the introduction as I did have a bit of a jovial dig at them over their apparent lack of sustainable thinking, dispensing complementary drinks in disposable plastic cups and giving away their virgin paper collections of leaflets in big plastic bags. They are supposed to be advising an industry dealing with nature and green stuff, what sort of image did they think they should be portraying? Anyway it gave them something else to think about for a moment of two. After a lot of striding about trying to find each other and lashings of retail therapy we eventually came home loaded with honey, cheese, pies and something to wash it all down with. Now I just need to get home to consume it. It’s a tough life.

Availability highlights
There is a fresh batch of Erigeron karvenskianus on line again with bud showing and first flowers now opening. We have never had this as a late summer line before but last year our trial plant in the garden flowered almost till Christmas and has flowered again nonstop since about April. We don’t have many, I just wanted to try it out. The compact and free flower Anthemis Charme are now in bud. They flower for ages.
Fresh batches of the ever popular Achillea coming on nicely with new flowers shoots appearing. There are a few nice short Nepeta Six Hills in bud at the moment. The dinky little Junior Walker has shoot back after a trim to make nice bushy plants with another flower flush showing.
The short Campanula carpatica is in bud again after an earlier trim. Lots of the Asters are busting a gut to get into bud, The mildew free Ashvi, Asmo, Asram, Starshine and Eleven Purple now have well developed bud and the odd open flower. Lady in Blue, Jenny and Starlight have loads of bud developing. We have a fantastic crop of Ajuga in range of leaf colours just bursting to get into the garden. Fresh batches of Euphorbia are looking nice in a range of foliage colours
Bright variegated leaves of the short tufted grass Carex Evergold are looking very neat and smart. Still a few of the compact Coreopsis Illico in bud, the odd bright yellow flower showing too.
Wooden box returns
We are having a scoot around collecting up any wooden boxes you may have ready for collection over the next few weeks so we can get them clean, dried and repaired ready for next spring. So please do drop us a line if you would like us to pop in and collect those up.
Thanks, have a good week from all at Kirton Farm Nurseries.

Tuesday, 29 August 2017

Hairy Holidays

Morning all,
Thundering tractors this morning as the farm are harvesting the field of very dark looking wheat behind the nursery. At least they are getting a few fine days now to get a good run going and grab the last few remaining fields which must be some sort of relief. The dodgy August weather has brought about a few extra challenges too. Apparently it has been perfect conditions for bindweed growth and the combination of this and the late cutting has produced green patches in some fields where the bindweed has climbed the stems of the wheat resulting in clogged up combines and very frustrated farmers. Looks like their weekend is sorted anyway, no worries about getting caught up in any holiday traffic which might be some sort of thin silver lining.
We have just hosted our NBIS nursery group meeting, with a tour of all our new kit we invested in during the winter and a review of all things horticultural, oh yes, and lunch at the pub. It was really refreshing to recap on all the changes over the last few months with, the new LED’s in the growth room, new lab cold store and media storage building (posh wooden shed), new mess room (another posh wooden shed), improved drainage works, new acid store, updated air con in the lab work room, new van and the new roof structure put up over the leaking lab buildings. Over the manic main selling and production season it’s easy to forget all the advances we made so a meeting like this can be a great opportunity to take a step back and see things a bit more clearly. Sharing a few worries and experiences with fellow sufferers always seems to produce a positive outcome, even if a lot of the content is potentially a bit negative (exchange rates, pesticide and imported disease issues, labour availability and ever increasing costs, Brexit worries, the list goes on (and on)). A problem shared is a problem halved and all that, it certainly keeps your feet on the ground and makes you grateful for what you have. I think the secret of the success of our group is that we are not afraid to be open and sometimes brutally honest, but above all not afraid to laugh at ourselves. The release of tension after a good laugh among friends beats most things.
I know many of you will be tied up with a busy bank holiday weekend, at least the weather looks like being ok for most of you. I hope you all have a good one without too much hassle, I’m still hoping for an afternoon at CrawleyFest to soak up some music and beer and if I can get up in time, slip away on our annual summer cruise/holiday (day trip to the Isle of Wight). Can’t wait.
I’m just hoping I can keep my back intact long enough to enjoy it all. The anticipation of a new mattress to help things along has evaporated with some very dodgy mornings, to the point where assistance has been required to get my socks on. A weekly evening yoga session has definitely helped with general bendiness and relaxation (I hesitate now to say ‘wellbeing’) although I do struggle with breathing through my feet and those other tricky skills I am supposed to pick up. I’m much more of a practical skills sort of chap, you should see (or maybe not) how in a matter of just a couple of steps I can drop boxers to the floor, step out with one foot, flick them up with the toes on the other, catch and deposit them in the laundry basket in a single movement. It promotes my feelings of accomplishment nearly as much as getting the tea bag in the mug from the other side of the table on route to the fridge. It’s the simple things that give back the most.

Availability highlights
There is a fresh batch of Erigeron karvenskianus on line again with bud showing and first flowers now opening. We have never had this as a late summer line before but last year our trial plant in the garden flowered almost till Christmas and has flowered again nonstop since about April. We don’t have many, I just wanted to try it out.
Fresh batches of the ever popular Achillea coming on nicely with new flowers shoots appearing. There are a few nice short Nepeta Six Hills in bud at the moment. The dinky little Junior Walker has shoot back after a trim to make nice bushy plants with another flower flush due in a week or two.
The short blue Campanula carpatica is in bud again after an earlier trim, we have white too but not so much bud on these yet. Lots of the Asters are busting a gut to get into bud, The mildew free Ashvi, Asmo, Asram, Starshine and Eleven Purple now have well developed bud and the odd open flower. Lady in Blue, Jenny and Starlight have loads of bud developing. We have a fantastic crop of Ajuga in range of leaf colours just bursting to get into the garden. Fresh batches of Euphorbia are looking nice in a range of foliage colours. Bright variegated leaves of the short tufted grass Carex Evergold are looking very neat and smart.
Just a few Hemerocallis Big Time Happy left, with a fresh batch of flower buds now on show. This recent introduction is a repeat flowering variety with nice big flowers, producing colour over a much longer season than most varieties.
Have a good week from all at Kirton Farm Nurseries.

Monday, 21 August 2017

Hairy Nuts

Morning all,

Feeling slightly autumnal now with the cooler evenings drawing in, but we could still get a warm end to the summer, there is always hope. There are plenty of pointers to summers wane though, the blackberries are ripening and earlier in the week we had a pull and my nuts to get them in before the pesky squirrels get the lot. It’s a great little crop, they keep for months, are really tasty and good for you, but enough work in the cracking to slow down consumption to sustainable levels. More than can be said for the apples and blackberries which went straight into a crumble to be consumed all week with the accompanying ice cream. The combined effect of also having a couple of birthdays with associated massive cake supply has been disastrous on the waistline but it’s so difficult to resist. I am wondering if the fact that I am preparing the dessert course may be my downfall. Not only do I get a bit heavy handed on portion control but my theory that if I have an extra mouthful straight from the bowl avoiding the dish it doesn’t count may not be working. I was thinking along the lines of ‘does a tree falling in a forest make a noise if there is no one there to hear it?’ Surely if no one sees my indulgence it can’t count.
We have our last nursery tour of the summer coming up. We are hosting our NBIS (nursery business improvement scheme) group for one of our quarterly meetings. We might have to whizz around to have a bit of a tidy up so we don’t look too dishevelled. It’s quite tricky at this time of year as we finish off the summer crops and clean up ready to get the spring crops potted, it all gets a bit chaotic with some tunnels looking like a bomb has hit and others looking clean, orderly and full of fresh stock, I will just have to steer them in the right direction. Luckily they have all been here before and will know how it is as we juggle staff levels, costs and work demands, most nurseries are all the same. We have a load of new stuff to show off since their last visit which should be fun. all the new LED lights, new lab media room and cold store, new mess room, drainage improvements and I can enthral them with my wind turbine and energy saving graphs as well as all our Green Impact prizes. I might knock up a nice cardboard badge to promote my status as National Green Impact Environmental Hero of 2017 I’m sure they will ridicule me endlessly for that, but then that’s what friends are for!
Don’t forget the Bank Holiday coming up, we are working up to trying for a possible day off with a couple of attractive local options on offer. Crawleyfest (our closest village) looks promising with much sustenance with live music, and possibly getting the passports out for a daytrip to the Isle of Wight. We’ll see, We love living life on the edge!

Availability highlights
There is a fresh batch of Erigeron karvenskianus on line again with bud showing, although not in colour just yet. We have never had this as a late summer line before but last year our trial plant in the garden flowered almost till Christmas and has flowered again nonstop since about April. We don’t have many, I just wanted to try it out. There are a few nice short Nepeta Six Hills in bud at the moment. The dinky little Junior Walker has been trimmed again to make nice bushy plants with another flower flush due in a week or two.
The short blue Campanula carpatica is in bud again after an earlier trim, we have white too but not so much bud on these yet. Lots of the Asters are busting a gut to get into bud, The mildew free Ashvi, Asmo, Asram, Starshine and Eleven Purple now have well developed bud and the odd open flower. Best crop ever so don’t miss out. Lady in Blue, Jenny and Starlight have loads of bud developing.
The gold foliaged Tradescantia is carrying it’s contrasting blue flowers nicely, it seem to go on forever this variety.We have a fantastic crop of Ajuga in range of leaf colours just bursting to get into the garden. The Hosta range is looking good again with a recent fresh summer growth spurt making a smart display. Sage Hot Lips has proved very popular again and we have a fresh batch of short trimmed plants with fresh bud on show. Dinky Erodium varieties are back again, low growing and flowering for ages.Fresh batches of Euphorbia are looking nice in a range of foliage colours
Fresh young plants of the very compact Coreopsis Illico are back on the list with fresh bud appearing, proving to be a popular new line for this year. Bright variegated leaves of the short tufted grass Carex Evergold are looking very neat and smart.
Have a good week from all at Kirton Farm Nurseries.